Ysaÿe, Eugène

Alle

Ysaÿe, Eugène

Caprice d’’après L’’Etude en Forme de Valse op. 52, No. 6 de C. Saint-Saëns for violin and orchestra

Art.-Nr.: 1616 Kategorie:

20,00 

Eugène Ysaÿe

(b. Liège, 16. July 1858 – d. Brussels, 12. May 1931)

Caprice d’après L’Etude en Forme de Valse Op. 52, No. 6 de C. Saint-Saëns

Preface

Eugène Ysaÿe was perhaps the most famous violinist of the late nineteenth century. But he was also a skilled conductor and an imaginative composer, whose compositions include an opera as well as orchestral and chamber works.
The music that follows is the first reprint of the 1901 Durand edition of Ysaÿe’s Caprice d’après l’étude en forme de valse, Op. 52, no. 6 de C. Saint-Saëns, an adaptation for violin and orchestra of the sixth of the Six Etudes, Op. 52 for piano by Camille Saint Saëns. This virtuoso showpiece was an audience favorite in its day, and it has been recorded by a number of contemporary violinists, including Joshua Bell and Maxim Vengerov. An example of the flourishing Franco-Belgian violin technique of the late nineteenth century, the work is of interest to performers, listeners, and music histori- ans. It conveys the spirit and style of the belle époque, and brings together two leading musical personalities of the era–the much-venerated composer Saint-Saëns, and his younger colleague, the celebrated violinist, teacher, and composer in his own right, Eugène Ysaÿe.
Ysaÿe was born in Liège, Belgium, in 1858. He began violin studies with his father at a very early age. He went on to study with Henryk Wieniawski and later with the Belgian violinist Henri Vieuxtemps in Paris. By his early 20s Ysaÿe was making a name for himself, and he began touring extensively as a soloist throughout Europe and eventu- ally in the United States.
Ysaÿe established relationships with the major composers of the time, including Franck, Saint-Saëns, Debussy, Chausson, and d’Indy. A number of important compositions were dedicated to him, including Franck’s Violin Sonata, Debussy’s String Quartet, Chausson’s Poeme, and Saint-Saëns’s String Quartet in E minor, Op. 112.
Ysaÿe was a tireless performer of new music. The Ysaÿe Quartet, which he founded in 1886, premiered a great number of works, including Debussy’s String Quartet. In
1894, he inaugurated an orchestral concert series in Brussels “for the purpose of of- fering an outlet for the works of new composers and providing employment for young musicians who had qualified at the Conservatoire.” (Ysaÿe and Ratcliff, 204) Ysaÿe conducted many of these concerts, which included new works as well as classic works by Vivaldi, Corelli, Bach, and Beethoven.
In 1918 Ysaÿe appeared as guest conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. His debut was so successful that he was offered a permanent position as conductor of the orchestra. He accepted and stayed in the position until 1922, when he returned to Belgium.
By this time, Ysaÿe was turning his attention more and more to conducting, composing, and teaching, performing less as a soloist due to a deterioration in his health. In 1929 the ravages of diabetes necessitated the amputation of his right foot. Nevertheless, he continued to work, completing an opera in the Walloon language which was pre- miered in Liège a few weeks before his death in 1931.
Virtually everyone who writes about Ysaÿe’s playing uses superlatives to describe his interpretive gifts, his virtuoso technique, and his outstanding musicianship. The vari- ety and subtlety of his vibrato, his forceful use of the bow, and the brilliance of his tone were noted by numerous listeners. Henry Roth comments that “Ysaÿe, who may well be considered the first violinist of modern times, burnished the extraordinary temperament of his playing with a cannily diversified usage of the vibrato.” (Roth,
26) In his memoirs, Notes Without Music, Darius Milhaud writes that Ysaye was “the prince of violinists, whose playing held both depth and sobriety. ” (Milhaud, 17) Isaac Stern, whose Guarnerius violin was once owned by Ysaÿe, wrote, “If I were given the opportunity to hear any two violinists in the entire history of the instrument, I would choose without hesitation Paganini and Ysaÿe.” (Stern, 134). Carl Flesch, one of the most important violinists and violin teachers of the early 20th century, called Ysaÿe “the most outstanding and individual violinist I have ever heard in all my life.” (Campbell, 111) Through both his playing and teaching Ysaye had an enormous influ- ence on subsequent generations of violinists, including his students Nathan Milstein, Josef Gingold, and William Primrose, as well as students of his students, such as Yehudi Menuhin.
Ysaÿe had a close association with Saint-Saëns, who “played a principal role in spon- soring the fine career that he

[Ysaÿe) enjoyed.” (A. Ysaye, 124) Ysaÿe composed his arrangement of the Saint-Saëns Etude en forme de valse in 1900. The Saint-Saëns is a virtuoso piano piece reminiscent of the Liszt Paganini études. Ysayë’s work is an in- genious adaptation of the piece and, it can be argued, is in many ways more interesting and musically vivid than the original on which it is based. Ysayë turns a somewhat routine, albeit technically challenging, piano piece into a miniature violin concerto that has a kind of sweep and grandeur, as well as delicacy and wit. Ysaÿe played it numerous times throughout his career with enormous success. (Benoit-Jeannin, 286)
The score was published by Durand in November, 1901 (Ratner, 32). In the May,
1901, issue of La Revue Blanche Debussy reviewed a performance of the piece by Ysaÿe that took place on April 5, 1901. This was probably the first performance of the work. Debussy’s review, however, is not enthusiastic. He comments that, “In this piece, Ysaÿe showed more virtuosity than art.” But Debussy also seems to recognize
the wittiness in the piece in his comment, “Why can’t Saint-Saëns be humorous if he wants?” (Debussy, 28)
Saint-Saëns himself was quite taken with Ysaÿe’s arrangement. After hearing Ysaÿe perform the work in Monte Carlo in February, 1904, he wrote to his publisher: “Aujourd’hui au concert…Isaÿe (sic) joue mieux que jamais. Il ajoute au programme son caprice sur mon Etude en forme de Valse, qui est une extravagance, mais amu- sante par le tour de force qu’elle constitue.” (Today at the concert…Ysaÿe played better than ever. He added to the program his caprice on my Etude en forme de Valse, which is an extravagance, but an amusing tour de force.) (Ratner, 33)
In arranging this work for violin and orchestra, Ysaÿe makes a number of effective changes. He transposes the Saint-Saëns, which is in the key of D-flat major, to D major. This makes it possible to have more open strings and natural harmonics, and the open strings give extra resonance to the sound even when they are not being played. Ysaÿe takes full advantage of the expressive range of the violin, both in the use of violinistic figurations and dynamic range. The piece abounds in virtuoso tech- niques, including very fast passage work, arpeggios, double stops in thirds, sixths, and octaves, harmonics, and sul ponticello playing. Writing in The Strad, the violinist Maxim Vengerov comments that “I love this piece for performing violin surgery on: there are so many tiny layers. It requires all the pyrotechnics and tricks that a violinist has, but you must also have wonderful taste.” (Vengerov, 98)
The piece is in a large ABA’ form. The first A section falls into two parts. The first part is made up of an introductory theme (mm. 1-34), the main theme (mm. 35-66), and a second contrasting theme in the dominant key (mm. 67-98). At the beginning of the second part, the introductory theme returns in shortened form (mm. 99-113). It is fol- lowed by a restatement of the main theme (mm. 114-145), and a shortened form of the second theme (mm. 146-166). As before, the main theme and second theme are in the tonic and dominant keys respectively. The section concludes with a shortened reprise of the introductory theme, this time played piano and finally pianissisimo, which acts as a transition to the B section.
Whereas the A section is dramatic and virtuosic, the B section is lyrical and graceful. It is also a great deal shorter than the A section, comprising only 48 measures (mm.
190-237). The theme of the B section is derived from the introductory theme of sec- tion A. Ysaÿe reworks the theme from the Saint-Saëns into a legato melody for the violin with arpeggiated accompaniment figures in the woodwinds. Then the legato melody is taken up by the orchestra with the violin playing an obligato based on the introductory theme. Here the oboe, clarinet, and horn each play a phrase of the melody, in counterpoint to the violin, creating a transparent orchestral color.
At the end of the B section, there is a retransition to the recapitulation of the A section. As noted above, the A section of the Ysaÿe arrangement is transposed up a half-step
from the D-flat major of the original to D major. The B section of the Saint-Saëns is in E major and Ysaÿe retains that key in his arrangement. This results in some differ- ences in the retransition to the A section, and Ysaÿe requires fewer measures than does Saint-Saëns to return to the tonic. The retransition, which is based on the introduc- tory theme, is a very virtuosic section for the violin. It builds to a crescendo leading to the entrance of the full orchestra in measure 266 with a restatement of the last part of the introductory theme, which then leads to the recapitulation of the main theme. In the recapitulation, the main theme is more fully orchestrated than in its previous statement, and the violin part is even more challenging. With a fleeting reference to the second theme, the music builds to a big climax leading to the coda, which begins in measure 341.
Ysaÿe makes a number of interesting alterations to create dramatic impact. The very first chord of the piece—a three-octave A played forte by the orchestra—is not present in the Saint-Saëns etude, which begins piano. This chord, immediately followed by the violin playing the introductory theme forte, seems to announce that what will fol- low is a virtuoso tour de force. Ysaÿe adds four measures to the introduction (mm.
17-20) in which the orchestra echoes the violin’s previous phrase in a big crescendo,
creating a concerto-like dialogue between the violin and orchestra.
Another felicitous touch occurs in the first part of the coda (mm. 341-376). The violin opens with a variation on the main theme, and eight measures later the woodwind instruments take turns imitating the violin in counterpoint. Because Ysaÿe draws on the full resources of the orchestra, the coda builds up a great deal of momentum and intensity, leading to the closing più vivo (mm. 377-405).
Ysaÿe’s arrangement is masterful, and there is no hint that the piece was originally for piano: the adaptation for violin and orchestra is complete and very convincing. This Caprice is a brilliant and lively work, a perfect encore piece, and a true showcase for the violin soloist. It requires a superlative technique as well as a combination of force- fulness, subtlety, and excellent timing in performance. It is fitting that the full score be republished and made available for study by all violinists.

Cynthia Miller © 2014

References

Benoit-Jeannin, Maxime. Eugène Ysaÿe: Le Sacre du Violon: Biographie. Ed. rev. et augm.

Bruxelles: Le Cri, 2001.

– Campbell, Margaret. The Great Violinists. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1981.

– Debussy, Claude. Debussy on Music. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1977.

– Milhaud, Darius. Notes Without Music. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1953.

– Ratner, Sabrina Teller. Camille Saint-Saëns, 1835-1923: A Thematic Catalogue of his

Complete Works. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002.

– Roth, Henry. Master Violinists in Performance. Neptune City, NJ: Paganiniana Publications, 1982.

– Stern, Isaac. My First 79 Years. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1999.

– Stockhem, Michel. “Eugene Ysaye.” In Grove Music Online. Oxford Music Online. Accessed

December 17, 2014.

– Todes, Ariane, and Maxim Vengerov. “Saint-Saëns’s Caprice d’après l’Étude en Forme de Valse.” The Strad 116, no. (Nov, 2005): 98-101. Academic Search Premier EBSCOhost. Accessed December 18, 2014. Persistant link: http://libdata.lib.ua.edu/login?url=http://search. ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=18718185&site=eds-live&scope=site

– Ysaÿe, Antoine. Ysaÿe. Great Missenden, Buckinghamshire: W.E. Hill, 1980.

– Ysaÿe, Antoine, and Bertram Ratcliffe. Ysaÿe: His Life, Work and Influence. London: William

Heinemann, 1947.

For performance material please contact Durand, Paris.


Eugène Ysaÿe

(geb. Lüttich [Liège], 16. Juli 1858 – gest. Brüssel, 12. Mai 1931)

Caprice d’après L’Etude en Forme de Valse op. 52, No. 6 de C. Saint-Saëns

Vorwort

Eugène Ysaÿe war der vielleicht berühmteste Violinist des späten 19. Jahrhunderts, aber auch ein erfahrener Dirigent und ideenreicher Komponist, dessen Werke sowohl eine Oper wie auch Orchester- und Kammermusik umfassen.
Die vorliegende Musik ist das erste Reprint der 1901 bei Durand erschienenen Ausgabe von Ysaÿe’s Caprice d’après l’étude en forme de valse op. 52, No. 6 de C. Saint-Saëns in der Adaption für Violine und Orchester der letzten der Sechs Etüden op.

52 für Klavier von Camille Saint-Saëns. Dieses virtuose Paradestück war damals ein Favorit beim Publikum und wurde von einer Reihe heutiger Violinisten eingespielt, darunter Joshua Bell und Maxim Vengerov. Als ein Beispiel für die blühende franco- belgische Violintechnik des späten 19. Jahrhunderts ist das Werk für Ausführende, Zuhörer und Musikhistoriker gleichermaßen reizvoll. Es vermittelt den Geist und Stil der belle époque und vereint zwei führende Persönlichkeiten der Musikwelt dieser

Ära – den hochgeachteten Komponisten Saint-Saëns und seinen jüngeren Kollegen, den berühmten Violinisten, Lehrer und autodidaktischen Komponisten Eugène Ysaÿe.
1858 in Lüttich (Belgien) geboren, bekam Ysaÿe in sehr jungen Jahren den ersten Violinunterricht von seinem Vater, später studierte er bei Henryk Wieniawski und da- rauf bei dem belgischen Violinisten Henri Vieuxtemps in Paris. In seinen frühen 20er
Jahren begann er, sich einen Namen als Solist zu machen und reiste ausgiebig durch
Europa und schließlich in die USA.
Ysaÿe pflegte mit den großen Komponisten der Zeit gute Beziehungen, darunter zu Franck, Saint-Saëns, Debussy, Chausson und d’Indy. Eine Reihe grosser Kompositionen sind ihm gewidmet, beispielsweise Franck’s Violinsonate, Debussy’s Streichquartett, Chausson’s Poeme und Saint-Saëns’s Streichquartett e-Moll op. 112.
Ysaÿe war ein unermüdlicher Interpret neuer Musik. Das Ysaÿe Quartett, das er 1886 gründete, spielte eine Vielzahl von Kompositionen zum ersten Mal, so auch Debussy’s Streichquartett. Im Jahr 1894 eröffnete er eine Orchester-Konzert-reihe in Brüssel
„zum Zweck einer Aufführungsmöglichkeit von Werken neuer Komponisten und als Angebot an junge Musiker, die sich am Konservatorium qualifiziert haben.“ [Ysaÿe and Ratcliff, 204). Viele dieser Konzerte, die sowohl neue wie auch klassische Werke von Vivaldi, Corelli, Bach und Beethoven umfassten, dirigierte der Violinvirtuose selbst.
1918 trat Ysaÿe als Gastdirigent des Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra auf. Sein Debut war so erfolgreich, dass ihm eine feste Anstellung als Dirigent dieses Orchester ange- boten wurde. Er nahm die Stelle an und blieb bis zu seiner Rückkehr nach Belgien im Jahr 1922 in dieser Position.
Zu dieser Zeit richtete Ysaÿe seine Aufmerksamkeit zunehmend auf das Dirigieren, das Komponieren und Lehren; als Solist konzertierte er aufgrund einer Verschlechterung seiner Gesundheit zunehmend weniger. Im Jahr 1929 machten die Folgen seiner Diabetes die Amputation seines rechten Fußes notwendig. Dennoch führte er seine Arbeit fort, vervollständigte eine Oper in wallonischer Sprache, die 1931 in Lüttich kurz vor seinem Tod uraufgeführt wurde.
Nahezu jeder, der über Ysaÿe’s Spiel schreibt, benutzt Superlative, um seine interpreta- torischen Gaben, die virtuose Technik und sein herausragendes musikalisches Können zu beschreiben. Die Vielfalt und Feinheit seines Vibratos, der kraftvolle Bogeneinsatz und die Brillanz seines Tones wurden von zahllosen Zuhörern hervorgehoben. Henry Roth merkt an: „Ysaÿe, der wohl als erster Violinist der modernen Zeit betrachtet werden kann, verfeinerte sein außergewöhnliches Temperament seines Spiels mit um- sichtig eingestreutem Einsatz von Vibrato.“ (Roth, 26) In seinen Memoiren Notes Without Music schreibt Darius Milhaud, dass Ysaÿe der Prinz der Violinisten gewe- sen sei, „dessen Spiel sowohl tiefgründig als auch schlicht ist.“ (Milhaud, 17). Isaac Stern, dessen Guarneri-Violine einst Ysaÿe besaß, notiert: „Wenn ich die Möglichkeit hätte, zwei Violinisten aus der Geschichte des Instruments zu hören, würde ich ohne Zögern Paganini und Ysaÿe wählen.“ (Stern, 134). Carl Flesch, einer der wichtigs- ten Violinisten und Lehrer des frühen 20. Jahrhunderts, nannte Ysaÿe „den heraus- ragendsten und eigenwilligsten Violinisten, den ich jemals in meinem Leben gehört habe.“ (Campbell, 111) Sowohl durch sein Spiel als auch durch sein Unterrichten hat- te Ysaÿe enormen Einfluss auf die nachfolgenden Violinisten-Generationen, darunter
seine Schüler Nathan Milstein, Josef Gingold und William Primrose wie auch auf die
Schüler seiner Schüler, etwa Yehudi Menuhin.
Ysaÿe unterhielt eine enge Beziehung mit Saint-Saëns, der „eine maßgebliche Rolle in der Unterstützung der großartigen Karriere, die er [Ysaÿe] genoß, spielte.“ (A. Ysaÿe,
124) Ysaÿe schuf sein Arrangement von Saint-Saëns’ Etude en forme de valse im Jahr
1900. Das originale Werk ist ein virtuoses Klavierstück, eine Reminiszenz an Liszts Paganini-Etüden. Ysaÿes Bearbeitung ist eine geniale Adaption der Komposition und, so man behaupten, in vielerlei Hinsicht interessanter und musikalisch lebendiger als die Vorlage. Ysaÿe verwandelt ein etwas gewöhnliches, wenngleich technisch an- spruchsvolles Klavierstück in ein kleines Violinkonzert, dass sowohl Schwung und Erhabenheit wie auch Zartheit und Witz besitzt. Er selbst spielte es in seiner Karriere zahllose Male mit riesigem Erfolg. (Benoit-Jeannin, 286)
Die Partitur wurde im November 1901 bei Durand veröffentlicht (Ratner, 32). Im Mai 1901 besprach Claude Debussy in einer Ausgabe der La Revue Blanche eine Aufführung des Werkes von Ysaÿe vom 5. April 1901. Dies war wahrscheinlich die erste Aufführung des Werkes. Debussy’s Rezension ist jedoch nicht sehr enthusias- tisch. Er merkt an, dass „Ysaÿe in diesem Stück mehr Virtuosität als Kunst“ zei- ge. Jedoch scheint Debussy den Witz des Stückes zu erkennen, in dem er anmerkt:
„Warum kann Saint-Saëns nicht humorvoll sein, wenn er es möchte?“ (Debussy, 28).
Saint-Saëns selbst war von Ysaÿe’s Arrangement angetan. Nach einer Aufführung des
Werkes im Februar 1904 in Monte Carlo schrieb er dem Verleger: „Heute im Konzert
… Isaÿe [sic] spielte besser als je zuvor. Er fügte dem Programm seine Caprice über meine Etude en forme de Valse hinzu, die eine extravagante, aber amüsante tour de force ist.“ (Ratner, 33)
Im Arrangement des Werkes für Violine und Orchester macht Ysaÿe eine Reihe wir- kungsvoller Änderungen. Er transponiert von Des-Dur, der originalen Tonart, nach D-Dur. Dies ermöglicht eine sinnvollere Nutzung leerer Saiten und des natürlichen Flageoletts; die leeren Saiten geben dem Klang eine besondere Resonanz, auch wenn sie nicht gespielt werden. Ysaÿe zieht den größtmöglichen Vorteil aus der Bandbreite im Ausdruck der Violine, sowohl im Gebrauch violinistischer Figurationen als auch der dynamischen Möglichkeiten. Das Stück ist reich an virtuosen Techniken, darun- ter sehr schnelle Passagen, Arpeggien, Doppelgriffe in Terzen, Sexten und Oktaven, Partialtöne sowie sul ponticello-Spiel. In The Strad merkt der Violinist Maxim Vengerov an: „ Ich liebe dieses Stück, um daran Violin-Praxis zu demonstrieren: Es gibt viele winzige Schichten. Es fordert all die Brillanz und Tricks heraus, die ein Violinst besitzt, dabei aber muss er immer einen guten Geschmack bewahren. „ (Vengerov, 98)
Das Stück steht in einer großen ABA’-Form. Der erste A-Teil gliedert sich in zwei
Abschnitte, wovon wiederum der erste aus dem einleitenden Thema (T. 1-34),
dem Hauptthema (T. 35-66) und einem zweiten kontrastierenden Thema in der Dominanttonart (T. 67-98) besteht. Zu Beginn des zweiten Abschnitts wiederholt sich das einleitende Thema in gekürzter Form (T. 99-103). Daran schließen sich eine Wiederaufnahme des Hauptthemas (T. 114-145) und ein gekürztes zweites Thema (T.
146-166) an. Wie zuvor stehen das Haupt- und das zweite Thema in der Tonika bzw. der Dominante. Der zweite Abschnitt schließt mit einer kurzen Reprise des einleiten- den Themas – dieses Mal vom Klavier gespielt und am Ende in pianissimo gehalten
–, die als Überleitung zum B-Teil fungiert.
Während der A-Teil dramatisch und virtuos ist, ist der B-Teil lyrisch und anmutig. Er ist mit nur 48 Takten (T. 190-237) deutlich kürzer als der A-Teil. Das Thema dieses Teils ist aus dem einleitenden Thema des A-Teils abgeleitet. Ysaÿe überarbeitet das Thema Saint-Saëns’ in eine legato-Melodie für Violine mit arpeggierten Begleitfiguren in den Holzbläsern. Danach wird diese Melodie vom Orchester aufgenommen, und die Violine spielt ein Obligato, das auf dem einleitenden Thema basiert. Hier spie- len jeweils Oboe, Klarinette und Horn im Kontrapunkt zur Violine eine Phrase der Melodie und erzeugen damit transparente Orchesterfarben.
Am Ende des B-Teils steht eine Rückführung zur Reprise des A-Teils. Wie oben geschrieben wurde der A-Teil des Arrangements einen Halbton von Dis-Dur nach D-Dur transponiert. Der B-Teil des Originals steht in E-Dur, und Ysaÿe behält diese Tonart in seinem Arrangement bei. Dies hat einige Unterschiede in der Rückführung zum A-Teil zur Folge, denn Ysaÿe benötigt weniger Takte als Saint-Saëns, um in die Tonika zurückzukehren. Die Rückführung, die auf dem einleitenden Thema ba- siert, ist eine sehr virtuose Passage für die Violine. Eine Crescendo-Linie bereitet den Einsatz des gesamten Orchesters in Takt 266 mit der Wiederaufnahme des letzten Teils des einleitenden Themas vor, das darauf zur Reprise des Hauptthemas führt. In der Reprise ist das Hauptthema voller orchestriert als im vorherigen Themen-Eintritt, und der Violin-Part ist herausfordernder. Mit einer kurzen Referenz an das zweite Thema baut sich die Musik zu einem starken Höhepunkt auf, der die Coda, die in Takt
341 beginnt, einleitet.
Ysaÿe nimmt einige interessante Veränderungen vor, um spektakuläre Effekte zu er- zielen. Der erste Akkord des Stückes – ein über drei Oktaven vom Orchester ge- spieltes A in forte – ist in der Etude von Saint-Saëns nicht vorhanden; sie beginnt im piano. Dieser Akkord, dem umgehend die Violine mit dem einleitenden Thema im forte folgt, scheint die danach folgende virtuose tour de force anzukündigen. Ysaÿe fügt vier Takte in der Einleitung hinzu (T. 17-20), in denen das Orchester die vorher in der Violine gespielte Phrase in einem großen crescendo wiederholt, und damit einen konzertähnlichen Dialog zwischen der Violine und dem Orchester erzeugt.
Ein weiterer gelungener Kniff tritt im ersten Teil der Coda (T. 341-376) auf. Die Violine eröffnet mit einer Variation des Hauptthemas und acht Takte später überneh- men die Holzbläser die Imitation der Violine im Kontrapunkt. Da Ysaÿe die gesamten
Möglichkeiten des Orchesters ausschöpft, türmt sich die Coda zu einem Abschluss voller Wucht und Intensität auf und führt in ein abschließendes più vivo (T. 377-405).
Ysaÿe’s Arrangement ist die Arbeit eines Meisters, es gibt keinen Hinweis darauf, dass das Stück einst für Klavier geschrieben wurde. Die Adaption für Violine und Orchester gelingt vollkommen und ist sehr überzeugend, ein brillantes und lebendiges Werk, ein perfektes Zugabestück und ein wahres Schaustück für den Solisten. Es erfordert eine hervorragende Technik ebenso wie eine Kombination aus Forschheit, Subtilität und einem exzellenten Tempogefühl. Es ist erfreulich, dass diese Wiederveröffentlichung die Partitur für alle Violinisten wieder verfügbar macht.

Übersetzung: Anke Westermann

Bibliographie

Benoit-Jeannin, Maxime. Eugène Ysaÿe: Le Sacre du Violon: Biographie. Ed. rev. et augm.

Bruxelles: Le Cri, 2001.

– Campbell, Margaret. The Great Violinists. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1981.

– Debussy, Claude. Debussy on Music. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1977.

– Milhaud, Darius. Notes Without Music. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1953.

– Ratner, Sabrina Teller. Camille Saint-Saëns, 1835-1923: A Thematic Catalogue of his

Complete Works. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002.

– Roth, Henry. Master Violinists in Performance. Neptune City, NJ: Paganiniana Publications,

1982.

– Stern, Isaac. My First 79 Years. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1999.

– Stockhem, Michel. “Eugene Ysaye.” In Grove Music Online. Oxford Music Online. Accessed

December 17, 2014.

– Todes, Ariane, and Maxim Vengerov. “Saint-Saëns’s Caprice d’après l’Étude en Forme de Valse.” The Strad 116, no. (Nov, 2005): 98-101. Academic Search Premier EBSCOhost. Accessed December 18, 2014. Persistant link: http://libdata.lib.ua.edu/login?url=http://search. ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=18718185&site=eds-live&scope=site

– Ysaÿe, Antoine. Ysaÿe. Great Missenden, Buckinghamshire: W.E. Hill, 1980.

– Ysaÿe, Antoine, and Bertram Ratcliffe. Ysaÿe: His Life, Work and Influence. London: William

Heinemann, 1947.

Aufführungsmaterial ist von Durand, Paris, zu beziehen.

Partitur Nr.

1616

Edition

Repertoire Explorer

Genre

Violine & Orchester

Seiten

80

Format

160 x 240 mm

Druck

Reprint

Klavierauszug

vorhanden