Fux, Johann Josef

Alle

Fux, Johann Josef

Concentus Musico-Instrumentalis, enthaltend sieben Partiten: Vier Ouvertüren, zwei Sinfonien, eine Serenade

Art.-Nr.: 1714 Kategorien: ,

28,00 

Johann Joseph Fux
(b. Hirtenfeld, Styria, 1660, d. Vienna 13 February 1741)
Concentus musico-instrumentalis
Enthaltend sieben Partiten:
Vier Ouvertüren, zwei Sinfonien, eine Serenade

I. Serenade in C major, K.352 p.7
II. Sinfonia a 6 in B-flat major, K.353 p.34
III. Overture a 4 in F major, K.354 p.50
IV. Overture a 6 in G minor, K.355 p.58
V. Overture a 4 in C major, K.356 p.72
VI. Overture a 4 in D minor, K.357 p.81
VII. Sinfonia a 2 in F major, K. 351 p.90

Johann Joseph Fux published his Concentus musico-instrumentalis in Nuremburg 1701 as his Opus 1. The work was dedicated to the Viennese Crown Prince Joseph (the son of Emperor Leopold I) who was then the King of Rome and ascended to the Austrian throne in 1705; in accepting the dedication, Joseph paid for the printing of the work. As the only publication of Fux’s instrumental music in his own lifetime, the set of seven instrumental works stand apart from Fux’s prodigious output of vocal works including approximately 90 settings of the Mass Ordinary, 80 works of Vespers, 20 secular dramatic works, and 10 complete oratorios.2 While less numerous than his vocal works, Fux’s instrumental compositions were popular in their day as well as in the modern era; a collection of his instrumental works was published in Denkmäler der Tonkunst in Österreich (DTÖ), vol. 19 edited by Guido Adler in 1902 (Repertoire Explorer Series No. 1665).

The seven works in the Concentus musico-instrumentalis are described as partitas (suites) but were also given specific titles: serenade, sinfonia, or overture which indicate the opening movement of each work: the serenade begins with a march, the overtures begin with a French Overture, and the sinfoniae begin with a single movement which synthesizes several sections in contrasting tempi. The movements in the Concentus are mostly short (as brief as 15 measures in one case); they are mostly dances but also use marches, arias or other common forms; and are basically homophonic with the melody clearly in the top voice. In the Concentus Fux avoids the imitative contrapuntal style typical of his sacred vocal music and described in his famous theory treatise Gradus ad Parnassum (1752). Instead, the Concentus demonstrates the style of popular and entertaining instrumental works common at the Austrian court. The sinfoniae do not make a clear, developmental link to the Classical Viennese symphonies of Haydn, but are collections of dances that were typical of aristocratic entertainment.

The opening work is the only piece labeled as a serenade in the collection (K. 352). It is a sprawling collection of 16 movements for a large orchestra with pairs of clarini (their only use in the Concentus) and oboes, strings (violin I and II, viola, bass), and continuo. In his study of Fux, Egon Wellez notes that the fifth movement is labeled as an Overture and the eleventh is an Intrada, which leads to the conclusion, “that the serenade consists of three suites.”3 Inserting an overture into the middle of a large collection of works to make a division is not uncommon at this time. In J. S. Bach’s “Goldberg” Variations (BWV 988), a French overture is used at variation 16 (of 30) to divide the collection into two halves. The term serenade for the first partita of the Concentus is given not because of its extensive length, but because of its suitability as a work for performance outdoors or in honor of a distinguished person. The work begins with a festive March featuring extensive clarini passages, which may remind modern listeners of J. S. Bach’s second Brandenburg Concerto. Fux’s March is followed by a Gigue, Menuetto, and Aria; the first four movements are in C major. The central section begins with an Overture followed by a Menuet and Trio, Gigue, Aria I, Aria II, and Bouree I and II (with a da capo of Bouree I). The clarini are tacet in these movements and all are in A minor, except for the concluding Bourees, which are in F Major. The final suite begins with an Intrada, featuring extensive solo passages for the clarino, followed by a Rigaudon, Ciconna, Gigue, Menuet and Finale. Most of the concluding movements are again in C major (except for the Gigue, which is in F major)

Of the remaining works, four are titled “Overture” (K. 354-357) and two are titled “Sinfonia” (K. 353 and 358). These are all collections of approximately of  four-eight movements each. These are all orchestral works, with the exception of the final Sinfonia, K. 358, which will be discussed below. Of the five orchestral works, K. 354, 356, and 357 are orchestrated only for strings (violin 1 and 2, viola, and basso continuo) and the other two orchestral works (K. 353 and K. 355) use the same string group with an added pair of oboes. The four Overtures begin with a French Overture—a brief rounded binary movement with a stately, homophonic duple section featuring dotted rhythms and rushing string passages, followed by a fast imitative triple section with a brief return to the homophonic material at the conclusion. The two Sinfoniae begin with multi-sectional movements mixing brief fast and slow sections melded into a single movement.
The concluding Sinfonia, K. 358 stands apart from the other partitas of the Concentus in several ways. The work is a trio sonata for flute, oboe, and continuo, rather than for orchestra. The opening movement is one of the few places in the Concentus where pervasive imitation dominates the texture. The following three movements all have descriptive names similar to those common in French dance collections by François Couperin. The second movement, “Le joye des fidels sujets,” is a deceptive minuet beginning on the second beat, which gives the movement a slightly unpredictable feel. The third movement combines an “Aria Italiana” in 6/8 for the flute with an “Arie françoise” in cut time for the oboe, which continues the unpredictable metric feel of the previous movement. The concluding movement, “Les e’nemis Confus,” and marked “Maestoso e deciso,” continues to confound the listener’s expectation; it is a minuet with a single beat anacrusis yet stylistically similar to the start of a French overture with excessive dotted figures and sweeping scale passages.

The Concentus musico-instrumentalis demonstrates the wide diversity of instrumental composition possible within the relatively predictable forms of dances, arias, and overtures. Fux combines musical traits of various European countries: French dances and overtures, Italian trio sonatas, German counterpoint and serenades—these international elements added to the refined, cosmopolitan enjoyment for the listeners. The creativity and invention of Fux’s instrumental works lies in the variety of subtle changes and departures of the normal forms that made the music pleasing, accessible, and entertaining to his court audiences.

The Concentus musico-instrumentalis was printed in Nuremburg in 1701; a copy of that print is held by the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin-Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Musikabteilung (D-B), Mus. 9739 Rara.4 The work appeared in Denkmäler der Tonkunst in Österreich (DTÖ), vol. 47 edited by Heinrich Rietsch (1916), from which this edition is taken. The Concentus has not appeared in the new edition of the composer’s works, Johann Joseph Fux: Sämtliche Werke, as of this writing. Among the modern performing editions of individual works in the Concentus are:

I. Serenade in C Major
– Edition Immer, Reihe 5: Orchesterwerke mit Trompete (Nagold: Spaeth/Schmid, 2008)
III. Overture in F Major
– edited by Wolfgang Gamerith, continuo realization by Franz Sebinger
(Graz: Akademische Druck- u. Verlaganstalt, 1980).
V. Overture in C Major
– edited by Paul Angerer, Diletto musicale, 110 (Wien: Doblinger, 1964).
VI. Overture in D minor
– edited by Wolfgang Gamerith, continuo realization by Franz Sebinger (Graz: Akademische Druck- u. Verlags-Anstalt, 1980). Musikschätze der Vergangenheit: Vokal- und Instrumentalmusik des 16. Bis 18. Jahrhunderts (Berlin: C. F. Vieweg, 1937).
– edited by Hilmar Höckner, continuo realization by Friedrich Wilhelm Lothar, Kalmus Orchestra Library, A 5642 (Miami: Kalmus, 1980).
VII. Sinfonia in F Major
– edited by Claude Crussard, Ars redivivia, 17 (Lusanne: Édition Fœtisch, 1966).
– edited by Leo Kunter, Nagles Musik-Archiv, 146 (Kassel: Nagels Verlag, 1957).
– edited by Adolf Hoffmann, Corona Wekreihe für Kammerorchestra, 18 (Wolfenbüttel: Möseler Verlag, before 1939); reprint ed., Deutsche Instrumentalmusik, 18 (Wolfenbüttel: Möseler Verlag, 1950).

C. Matthew Balensuela, DePauw University, 2015

1 A new thematic catalog of Fux’s music is currently under preparation by Thomas Hochradner, Martin Czernin, and Géza-M. Vörösmarty, Johann Joseph Fux: thematisches Verzeichnis der musikalischen Werke. Fux’s works were previously cataloged by several editors and are prefixed with different letters: K=Ludwig Ritter von Köchel, Johann Josef Fux (Vienna, 1872; reprint ed. Hildesheim and New York; Olms, 1974); E= Hellmut Federhofer and Friedrich Wilhelm Riedel, “Quellenkundliche Beiträge zur Johann Joseph Fux-Forschung,” Archiv für Musikwissenschaft 21 (1964); 111-40 and 253-4; and L=Andreas Liess, Johann Joseph Fux, ein steirischer Meister des Barock, nebst einem Verzeichnis neuer Wekfunde (Vienna: Doblinger, 1947).
2 Harry White and Thomas Hochradner, “Fux Johann Joseph,” Grove Music Online. Oxford Music Online (Oxford University Press, accessed July 2015).
3 Egon Wellez, Fux, Oxford Studies of Composers (London: Oxford University Press, 1965), 18.
4 A digital copy is available online at http://resolver.staatsbibliothek-berlin.de/SBB0000C2DD00000000.

Aufführungsmaterial siehe Vorwort. Nachdruck eines Exemplars der Musikbibliothek der Münchner Stadtbibliothek, München.


 

Johann Joseph Fux
(geb. Hirtenfeld, Steiermark, 1660 – gest. Wien 13 Februar 1741)

Concentus musico-instrumentalis
Enthaltend sieben Partiten:
Vier Ouvertüren, zwei Sinfonien, eine Serenade

I. Serenade in C-Dur, K.352 p.7
II. Sinfonia a 6 in B-Dur, K.353 p.34
III. Overture a 4 in F-Dur, K.354 p.50
IV. Overture a 6 in g-Moll, K.355 p.58
V. Overture a 4 in C-Dur, K.356 p.72
VI. Overture a 4 in d-Moll, K.357 p.81
VII. Sinfonia a 2 in F-Dur, K. 351 p.90

Johann Joseph Fux veröffentlichte sein Concentus musico-instrumentalis in Nürnberg 1701 als sein Opus 1. Das Werk war dem Wiener Kronprinzen Joseph (Sohn des Kaisers Leopold I) gewidmet, der König von Rom war und 1705 den österreichischen Thron bestieg. Joseph akzeptierte die Widmung und bezahlte die Druckausgabe des Werks. Als einzige Publikation von Fux‘s Werken, die zu seinen Lebzeiten erschien, nehmen diese sieben Instrumentalwerke eine Sonderstellung gegenüber seinem fruchtbaren Schaffen auf dem Gebiet der Vokalmusik ein, darunter ungefähr 90 Vertonungen der heiligen Messe, 80 Werke zur Vesper, 20 säkulare dramatische Werke und 10 vollständige Oratorien.2 Obwohl weniger zahlreich als Fux‘s Kompositionen für Stimme waren seine instrumentalen Kompositionen zu ihrer Zeit ebenso beliebt wie heute. Eine Auswahl seiner Instrumentalkompositionen erschien in den Denkmäler der Tonkunst in Österreich (DTÖ), Band. 19 herausgegeben von Guido Adler im Jahr 1902 (Repertoire Explorer Nr. 1665).

Die sieben Werke des Concentus musico-instrumentalis sind als Partiten (Suiten) gekennzeichnet, haben aber auch spezifische Titel: Serenade, Sinfonie oder Ouvertüre, die die eröffnenden Sätze jedes Werkes bezeichnen. Die Serenade beginnt mit einem Marsch, die Ouvertüren mit einer französischen Ouvertüre und die Sinfonien mit einem Einzelsatz, der die verschiedenen Sektionen in kontrastierenden Rhythmen zusammenfasst. Die Sätze des Concentus sind in der Regel kurz (in einem Fall nur 15 Takte lang), oftmals Tänze,  aber auch Märsche, Arien oder andere gängige Formen, durchweg homophon mit einer deutlichen Melodie in der Oberstimme. Im Concentus meidet Fux den imitativen kontrapunktischen Stil, der typisch für seine sakrale Vokalmusik ist und die er in seiner berühmten Abhandlung Gradus ad Parnassum (1752) beschreibt. Stattdessen demonstriert der Concentus den Stil populärer und unterhaltender Instrumentalmusik, wie sie am Wiener Hof üblich war. Die Sinfonien haben keine klare entwicklungsgeschichtliche Verbindung zu den klassischen Wiener Sinfonien von Haydn, sondern versammeln Tänze, wie sie für die aristokratische Unterhaltung typisch waren.

Das eröffnende Werk ist die einzige Komposition der Sammlung, die als Serenade bezeichnet ist (K. 352). Es handelt sich um eine umfangreiche Zusammenstellung von 16 Sätzen für grosses Orchester mit Paaren von Tromben (dieses Instrument wird nur in diesem Teil des Zyklus verwendet), Oboen, Fagott, Streicher (Violine I und II, Bratsche, Bass) und Continuo. In seiner Studie zu Fux bemerkt Egon Wellesz, dass der fünfte Satz als Ouvertüre und der elfte als Intrada bezeichnet ist, was darauf schliessen lässt, dass die Serenade aus drei Suiten besteht.3 Die Einfügung einer Ouvertüre in die Mitte einer umfangreichen Sammlung war zu jener Zeit nicht untypisch. In Johann Sebastian Bachs Goldberg – Variationen (BWV 988) wird eine französische Ouvertüre in Variation 16 (von 30) verwendet, um den Zyklus in zwei Hälften zu teilen. Der Begriff der Serenade für die erste Partita des Concentus wird nicht verwendet wegen deren außerordentlicher Länge, sondern wegen ihrer Eignung für Freiluftaufführungen zu Ehren einer angesehenen Person. So beginnt das Werk mit einem festlichen Marsch, der ausführliche Passagen für die Tromben bereithält, die den modernen Hörer an Bachs zweites Brandenburgisches Konzert erinnern mögen. Fux‘s  Marsch wird gefolgt von Gigue, Menuett und Aria, allesamt inklusive des Marsches in C-Dur. Die zentrale Sektion beginnt mit einer Ouvertüre, dann schliessen sich Menuett und Trio, Gigue, Aria I und II und Bourre I und II (mit einem dacapo des Bourre I) an. In diesen Sätzen, alle in A – Dur bis auf  das Bouree in F-Dur, schweigen die Trombem. Die abschliessende Suite beginnt mit einer Intrada, hier erklingen wieder ausgedehnte solistische Passagen für die Trombe, danach sind  Rigaudon, Ciconna, Gigue, Menuet und das Finale zu hören. Die meisten der abschliessenden Sätze stehen wiederum in C-Dur (ausser der Gigue in F-Dur).

Von den restlichen Werken haben vier den Titel Ouvertüre (K.354 – 357) und zwei sind Sinfonia (K.353 und 358) genannt. Dies sind Sammelwerke von jeweils ungefähr vier bis acht Sätzen, allesamt für Orchester gesetzt mit Ausnahme der abschliessenden Sinfonia K358, die weiter unten diskutiert wird. Von den fünf Orchesterwerken sind K. 354, 356 und 357 nur für Streicher (Violine I und II, Bratsche und Basso Continuo) konzipiert, während die anderen zwei Orchesterstücke (K. 353 und K. 355) dieser Streichergruppe ein Oboenpaar hinzufügen. Die vier Ouvertüren beginnen mit einer französischen Ouvertüre – ein kurzer, binärer Satz mit einer feierlichen, homophonen Sektion im Zweiertakt, die punktierte Rhythmen und sausende Streicherpassagen präsentiert, abgelöst von einer schnellen imitativen Sektion im Dreiertakt mit einer kurzen Wiederkehr des homophonen Materials am Schluss. Die zwei Sinfonien beginnen mit einem multisektionalen Satz, der kurze schnelle und langsame Abschnitte in einem gemeinsamen Abschnitt verschmilzt.

In vielerlei Hinsicht nimmt die abschliessende Sinfonia, K. 358 eine Sonderstellung innerhalb der anderen Partiten des Concentus ein. Das Werk ist eine Triosonate für Flöte, Oboe und Continuo. Der einleitende Satz gehört zu den wenigen Gelegenheiten, bei denen Imitation durchgängig die Struktur formt. Die darauf folgenden Sätzen tragen alle beschreibende Namen ähnlich denen, wie  sie in den Tanzsammlungen von von Francois Couperin üblich waren. Der zweite Satz Le joye des fidels sujets ist ein irreführendes Menuett, beginnt es doch auf dem zweiten Schlag des Taktes, was dem Satz eine unvorhersehbare Note verleiht. Der dritte Satz vereint eine Aria Italiana für Flöte im 6/8 – Takt  und eine Arie françoise für Oboe im 2/2-Takt und setzt das Gefühl unberechenbarer Metrik des vorangegangenen Satzes fort. Auch der letzte Satz Les e’nemis Confus, bezeichnet als “Maestoso e deciso”, fährt fort, die Erwartungen des Hörers zu verwirren. Obwohl ein Menuett mit einschlägigem Auftakt, ähnelt es dem Beginn der französischen Ouvertüre mit ihren punktierten Rhythmen und fegenden Tonleiterpassagen.

Der Concentus musico-instrumentalis führt eine grosse Vielfalt an Instrumentalwerken zusammen, die sich innerhalb der vorhersehbaren Formen von Tänzen, Arien und Ouvertüren bewegen. Fux vereint musikalische Traditionen der verschiedenen europäischen Länder: Französische Tänze und Ouvertüren, italienische Triosonaten, deutschen Kontrapunkt und Serenaden – diese internationalen Elemente trugen zur gehobenen kosmopolitischen Unterhaltung ihrer Zuhörer bei. Die Kreativität von Fux‘s instrumentalen Schöpfungen liegt in der Vielfalt der subtilen Änderungen und Abweichungen von der konventionellen Form, die die Musik ansprechend, verständlich und unterhaltend für das Publikum am Hofe machten.

Der Concentus musico-instrumentalis wurde 1701 in Nürnberg gedruckt. Eine Ausgabe liegt in der Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin-Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Musikabteilung (D-B), Mus. 9739 Rara.4 Ausserdem erschien der Zyklus in Denkmäler der Tonkunst in Österreich (DTÖ), Band. 47,  herausgegegeben von  Heinrich Rietsch (1916),  auf dem diese Ausgabe beruht. Nicht erschienen ist der Concentus heute  (November 2015) in der neuen Ausgabe der Werke des Komponisten Johann Joseph Fux: Sämtliche Werke. Moderne Aufführungseditionen der individuellen Werke des Concentus sind:

I. Serenade in C-Dur
Edition Immer, Reihe 5: Orchesterwerke mit Trompete (Nagold: Spaeth/Schmid, 2008).
III. Ouvertüre in F-Dur
herausgegegben von Wolfgang Gamerith, Continuo von Franz Sebinger (Graz: Akademische Druck- u. Verlag        sanstalt, 1980).
V. Ouvertüre in C-Dur
herausgegegben von Paul Angerer, Diletto musicale, 110 (Wien: Doblinger, 1964).
VI. Overture in D-Moll
herausgegeben von  Wolfgang Gamerith, Continuo von Franz Sebinger (Graz: Akademische Druck- u. Ver-
lagsanstalt, 1980). 
Musikschätze der Vergangenheit: Vokal- und Instrumentalmusik des 16. Bis 18. Jahrhunderts         (Berlin: C. F. Vieweg, 1937).
herausgegeben von Hilmar Höckner, Continuo von Friedrich Wilhelm Lothar, Kalmus Orchestra Library,
A 5642 (Miami: Kalmus, 1980).
VII. Sinfonia in F-Dur
herausgegeben von Claude Crussard, Ars redivivia, 17 (Lusanne: Édition Fœtisch, 1966).
herausgegeben von Leo Kunter, Nagles Musik-Archiv, 146 (Kassel: Nagels Verlag, 1957).
herausgegeben von Adolf Hoff mann, Corona Wekreihe für Kammerorchester, 18 (Wolfenbüttel: Möseler Verlag,         vor 1939); Reprint, Deutsche Instrumentalmusik, 18 (Wolfenbüttel: Möseler Verlag, 1950).

C. Matthew Balensuela
DePauw University, 2015

1 Ein neuer thematischer Katalog von Fux‘s Musik ist gerade in Vorbereitung: Thomas Hochradner, Martin Czernin und Géza-M. Vörösmarty, Johann Joseph Fux: thematisches Verzeichnis der musikalischen Werke. Fux‘s Werke wurde bereits von unterschiedlichen Herausgebern katalogisiert und mit verschiedenen Kennzeichnungen versehen: K = Ludwig Ritter von Köchel, Johann Josef Fux (Vienna, 1872; Reprint hrsg. von Hildesheim und New York; Olms, 1974); E = Hellmut Federhofer und Friedrich Wilhelm Riedel, “Quellenkundliche Beiträge zur Johann Joseph Fux-Forschung,” Archiv für Musikwissenschaft 21 (1964); 111-40 und 253-4, und L = Andreas Liess, Johann Joseph Fux, ein steirischer Meister des Barock, nebst einem Verzeichnis neuer Wekfunde (Wien: Doblinger, 1947).
2 Harry White und Thomas Hochradner, “Fux Johann Joseph,” Grove Music Online. Oxford Music Online (Oxford University Press, Stand Juli 2015).
3 Egon Wellez, Fux, Oxford Studies of Composers (London: Oxford University Press, 1965), 18.
4 Eine digital Kopie its erhältlich online under  http://resolver.staatsbibliothek-berlin.de/SBB0000C2DD00000000.

Aufführungsmaterial siehe Vorwort. Nachdruck eines Exemplars der Musikbibliothek der Münchner Stadtbibliothek, München.

Partitur Nr.

1714

Edition

Repertoire Explorer

Genre

Orchester

Seiten

110

Format

210 x 297 mm

Druck

Reprint